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Don’t Accept the Slow Season

in Sales
Tom Woodcock
Tom Woodcock

By Tom Woodcock

Winter is approaching. Work conditions will decline, ground will harden and everyone goes from holiday mode to winter blah. No one is spending any money and projects are scarce. Time to hold your breath and ride your line of credit through this annual recession.

Not so fast!

Throwing in the towel before the season even changes is awfully defeatist. The real course of action is to dig down deep and drive your sales effort. Opportunity may slow down, but it doesn’t disappear.

I’ve worked with enough contractors to know the difference between those that thrive through the winter and those who starve. The firms that go hungry are those that resign themselves to the norm and do nothing to move the bar. The true winners are those that look for every sales vehicle possible to get in front of the customer base therefore, opportunity. They gain a presence physically, electronically, and proactively. They’re not sitting by the phone waiting for it to ring or surfing the Internet for hours at a time. They understand that it takes work to find the projects that break over the winter. Not just those that bid this time of year, but also those that begin.

There is always pressure to go with the historical processes that the construction industry has sustained. Get fat over spring and summer then hibernate over the winter.

I refuse to let my clients accept this logic. We sit down and develop aggressive sales schedules and implement them. We keep the company accountable and review the results. Areas that we feel are the most likely to produce opportunity get the greatest sales attention. We then attack from a selling perspective and don’t let up. These opportunities may take more face-to0face customer time but often we’re the only ones actively pursuing them. This presents a great opportunity to steal a regular customer from a competitor.

Most people think that when they are actively engaged with a customer on a project, they’re selling. Not true. That’s servicing.

It’s what you do with customers when there isn’t a project on the table that falls into the sales category. It’s easy to communicate with a customer in the middle of a summer project. There are details to cover and schedules to meet. That’s a main component of a contractor servicing their client. It’s much more difficult to communicate when you’re not reviewing those elements, to actually talk to your customer on another level. Because of that difficulty, few people actually do it.

So this is the scenario: few people are actively calling on customers, you have time, and projects exist. Seems like an ideal situation for securing some business.

The challenge is to have the discipline and the plan to go after it. The first step is eliminating the “slow season” mentality. I’m not sure about you, but I prefer to be busy year-round. It can make sales projections easier and growth more possible when you gain business every month of the year instead of just nine.

Once this becomes part of your sales program, it tends to grow stronger year after year. You begin to recognize the vertical markets that produce opportunity during the winter months. You can then continue to develop your approach and marketing efforts to capitalize on the seasonal opportunities.

It is kind of like landscaping in the spring and summer and plowing snow in the winter, a common practice in property maintenance. Translation in construction terms: ground up in the spring and summer then renovation in the winter. That is just an example.

You can superimpose that formula on almost any construction trade of dynamic, if you’re willing to. That’s the rub. It’s easier to simply ignore this opportunity and kick back. Some see it as a time to catch their breath business wise. In reality, it’s more like holding your breath.

Investigating which market segments are progressing indicate where projects exist. Developing a sales approach to those markets and enacting it can unveil opportunities. Few people do this kind of sales work in the proverbial slow season.

The size of your company is irrelevant if you truly prioritize the sales effort. Breaking the trend is the most difficult part in conjunction with extending patience till results begin to occur. Selling is never a situation where you simply snap your fingers and the business magically appears. It requires planning, effort, and diligence, especially in a season that traditionally is not productive.

Anyone can secure business when there’s plenty for everyone. The real sales professionals secure it during the leaner times. When the bit players disappear and the field opens up, more commonly known as the Slow Season!

Tom Woodcock, president, seal the deal, is a speaker and trainer to the construction industry nationwide. He can be reached at his website: www.tomwoodcocksealthedeal.com or at 314-775-9217.

 

True Sales Support

in Columns/Sales
Tom Woodcock
Tom Woodcock

By Tom Woodcock

I understand sales personnel need to be as accurate as possible before moving transactions to sales support. The better the information on the front end, the better the support effort on the back. With that being said, true sales support is tough to find.

The sales process may vary from company to company or product to product, but each sale has a process. Securing the customer and landing the deal are only the first steps. In construction, there are many additional facets to the sales transaction, any one of which can make or break the transaction.

Efficiency in the sales process directly relates to the customer experience and success rate of the corporate sales effort. Don’t let paperwork, material ordering, or communication with subcontractors interrupt the project or sales schedule. Not keeping the customer first lets details get bogged down in procedures or red tape. Throw a dose of company politics, mixed with mutual disrespect between sales and administration, and a mess develops. This can cause customers dissatisfaction and frustration, which often ripens into negative reviews and lack of referrals. Perish the thought of ever getting another project if that customer has recurring business.

Many companies have brought me in to help generate greater business volume. They want a full backlog of work at great margins. They tend to feel their front end sales approach is the problem. Often, I find their sales process is lacking or broken. There is no sense of urgency, little initiative to help the selling party and often resistance to sales if the documentation isn’t perfect. Whether it’s an issue of control, lack of understanding of the customer’s experience, or a perceived respect problem, the customer takes the hit. This can manifest in delays or cost overruns.

Support personnel need to understand that securing business in a sales environment is the most important aspect of any business. No sales, no paper. Not that their position isn’t critical, but those charged with getting business are there to do just that. Internal support networks are built to do just that, support. They end up making the sales agent look like a rock star, or incompetent.

The reinforcement of the commitments made by the sales rep goes a long way towards the establishment of the company’s credibility. By counteracting the sales person’s commitments, they send the customer the message that the rep is less than genuine and the company is inefficient.

I’m very aware of the fact that many sales agents promise the impossible, but that’s a different topic. Doing everything that you can to meet the customer’s expectations, if at all possible, is the essence of great sales support. The easy thing to do is to not perform and then blame the sales individual. That may be accurate, but it’s not optimum for the company.

I’ve mediated many battles between sales and support, some of them pretty nasty situations. Mutual understanding and respect for each party’s role in the sales process closes the gap between them. Good communication back and forth, verbally if feasible, clears up discrepancies. Avoiding condescending tones, venting, and blaming shows a higher level of business maturity. Few companies take the time to cultivate this type of environment. They let these internal relationships develop organically hoping for the best. Rarely do they end up with the result they hoped for.

Merely stating that you need cohesion between sales and support isn’t enough. It’s a daily practice that needs to be nurtured and reinforced. Ignoring a problem can result in delayed transactions, disgruntled employees, and loss of personnel, all of which are detrimental to a strong sales effort. Investing in training on the internal customer for sales personnel and the critical aspect of sales for the support personnel can bring an awareness of each party’s role.

Companies that work to develop the relationship between sales and support end up with a smooth flowing machine. They achieve a higher standard and set the bar high for competitors. This all takes self-evaluation and effort to be successful. Companies willing to practice this development will enjoy the fruits of it: high morale, extra effort, and increased revenue. Not to mention the value it brings to customers.

The reasons are critical. Gaining separation from the competition is not just the result of value, which is what is often taught. It is also the culmination of team effort, a value proposition rarely taught and seldom seen. The greater the customer experience front to back, the greater the value they perceive. This can reduce competitive influence and breed loyalty.

True sales support is simply part of a more profitable equation. The alternative can only result in more price competition and number shopping. Usually, contractors blame the customer for this behavior. In reality, looking internally may be the solution. Interesting to realize that the way we interact with one another in the sales process is so influential on the sales success of our companies.

Tom Woodcock, president, seal the deal, is a speaker and trainer to the construction industry nationwide. He can be reached at his website: www.tomwoodcocksealthedeal.com or at 314-775-9217.

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