True Sales Support

in Columns/Sales
Tom Woodcock
Tom Woodcock

By Tom Woodcock

I understand sales personnel need to be as accurate as possible before moving transactions to sales support. The better the information on the front end, the better the support effort on the back. With that being said, true sales support is tough to find.

The sales process may vary from company to company or product to product, but each sale has a process. Securing the customer and landing the deal are only the first steps. In construction, there are many additional facets to the sales transaction, any one of which can make or break the transaction.

Efficiency in the sales process directly relates to the customer experience and success rate of the corporate sales effort. Don’t let paperwork, material ordering, or communication with subcontractors interrupt the project or sales schedule. Not keeping the customer first lets details get bogged down in procedures or red tape. Throw a dose of company politics, mixed with mutual disrespect between sales and administration, and a mess develops. This can cause customers dissatisfaction and frustration, which often ripens into negative reviews and lack of referrals. Perish the thought of ever getting another project if that customer has recurring business.

Many companies have brought me in to help generate greater business volume. They want a full backlog of work at great margins. They tend to feel their front end sales approach is the problem. Often, I find their sales process is lacking or broken. There is no sense of urgency, little initiative to help the selling party and often resistance to sales if the documentation isn’t perfect. Whether it’s an issue of control, lack of understanding of the customer’s experience, or a perceived respect problem, the customer takes the hit. This can manifest in delays or cost overruns.

Support personnel need to understand that securing business in a sales environment is the most important aspect of any business. No sales, no paper. Not that their position isn’t critical, but those charged with getting business are there to do just that. Internal support networks are built to do just that, support. They end up making the sales agent look like a rock star, or incompetent.

The reinforcement of the commitments made by the sales rep goes a long way towards the establishment of the company’s credibility. By counteracting the sales person’s commitments, they send the customer the message that the rep is less than genuine and the company is inefficient.

I’m very aware of the fact that many sales agents promise the impossible, but that’s a different topic. Doing everything that you can to meet the customer’s expectations, if at all possible, is the essence of great sales support. The easy thing to do is to not perform and then blame the sales individual. That may be accurate, but it’s not optimum for the company.

I’ve mediated many battles between sales and support, some of them pretty nasty situations. Mutual understanding and respect for each party’s role in the sales process closes the gap between them. Good communication back and forth, verbally if feasible, clears up discrepancies. Avoiding condescending tones, venting, and blaming shows a higher level of business maturity. Few companies take the time to cultivate this type of environment. They let these internal relationships develop organically hoping for the best. Rarely do they end up with the result they hoped for.

Merely stating that you need cohesion between sales and support isn’t enough. It’s a daily practice that needs to be nurtured and reinforced. Ignoring a problem can result in delayed transactions, disgruntled employees, and loss of personnel, all of which are detrimental to a strong sales effort. Investing in training on the internal customer for sales personnel and the critical aspect of sales for the support personnel can bring an awareness of each party’s role.

Companies that work to develop the relationship between sales and support end up with a smooth flowing machine. They achieve a higher standard and set the bar high for competitors. This all takes self-evaluation and effort to be successful. Companies willing to practice this development will enjoy the fruits of it: high morale, extra effort, and increased revenue. Not to mention the value it brings to customers.

The reasons are critical. Gaining separation from the competition is not just the result of value, which is what is often taught. It is also the culmination of team effort, a value proposition rarely taught and seldom seen. The greater the customer experience front to back, the greater the value they perceive. This can reduce competitive influence and breed loyalty.

True sales support is simply part of a more profitable equation. The alternative can only result in more price competition and number shopping. Usually, contractors blame the customer for this behavior. In reality, looking internally may be the solution. Interesting to realize that the way we interact with one another in the sales process is so influential on the sales success of our companies.

Tom Woodcock, president, seal the deal, is a speaker and trainer to the construction industry nationwide. He can be reached at his website: www.tomwoodcocksealthedeal.com or at 314-775-9217.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

*