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HOK and RDG Complete Lauritzen Outpatient Center in Omaha

in Companies/News

New 170,000-sq.-ft. facility incorporates smart design and new technology to optimize the patient experience at Nebraska Medicine.

A new one-stop shop for comprehensive outpatient services has begun serving patients at Nebraska Medicine in Omaha.

HOK’s St. Louis practice teamed with Omaha-based RDG Planning & Design to design the $71 million Lauritzen Outpatient Center, which consolidates Nebraska Medicine – Nebraska Medical Center’s outpatient services in a 170,000-sq.-ft. medical building with a below-ground parking garage.

HOK, which led the overall programming for the Lauritzen Outpatient Center, guided the medical planning and layout of the clinical spaces. RDG provided architectural, interior design and medical documentation.

As part of the planning process, the two firms gathered input from 150 medical and administrative personnel at Nebraska Medicine’s outpatient facilities in Omaha. During a planning workshop, clinical teams created mock-up exam and operating rooms and studied patient flows. The design team used this information to guide planning discussions and develop a final building layout that breaks down departmental silos and creates adjacencies that enable clinicians to provide the best possible patient care.

“Our team made every decision through a filter of creating the optimal experience for Nebraska Medicine patients,” said Kerry Cheung, AIA, senior medical planner at HOK. “For example, we located the orthopedic clinic, rehab therapies and radiology department together to increase collaboration among clinicians and to create a one-stop-shop for patients. Exam rooms are intuitively arranged in pods according to specialties.”

“It was an incredibly thoughtful process to unify Nebraska Medicine personnel, designers and the building team in a single vision devoted to creating the best patient experience,” added Nate Gieselman, RDG architect and project manager. “This also streamlined the planning process, which normally would have taken four years but only took two-and-a half years.”

The design features an abundance of natural light with fritted windows and sunscreens that moderate heat load while brightening waiting areas and public spaces on all four floors. A prominent central stairway is bathed in light, promoting health and well-being. Clear wayfinding and a highly efficient layout help reduce wait times and provide easy access to ambulatory services.

The first floor unites related services including the orthopedic clinic, radiology department and an outpatient pharmacy. It also features a rehabilitation gym for the center’s sports medicine practice.

The second floor houses the Fritch Surgery Center, which comprises 10 operating rooms and 40 pre- and post-operation rooms. The surgery center waiting area includes private consultation rooms for doctors and families. Work is underway to create a skywalk connecting the second floor to Nebraska Medicine’s Truhlsen Eye Institute next door.

Specialized clinics occupying the third floor of the building include services for Ear, Nose and Throat (ENT), Audiology, Allergy, General Surgery Clinic, Trauma Clinic, Plastics Clinic, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Oral Facial Prosthetics and Urology Surgery. The fourth floor houses orthopedics faculty and research and telemedicine staff.

“There are so many talented healthcare professionals under one roof at the Lauritzen Outpatient Center,” said Jared Long, ENT clinic manager. “It has been fun to watch the teams grow into the new space and lean on each other to create the optimal patient experience. Care coordination has been streamlined. For example, a patient arrives in the General Surgery Clinic for a consult, but really needs to see an ENT specialist. When appropriate, nurses and providers have partnered together across specialties—located on the same floor—to work these patients into the schedule, preventing them from having to return a different day.”

The team designed the center to facilitate ease of registration with self-check-in kiosks and online registration, which will be implemented in the future. The plan also allows for personal check-ins with outpatient healthcare staff.

“We struck a balance between the efficiency of online check-ins and providing a more personal touch,” said Cheung. “This idea borrows from today’s airport experience, where you can check in online or at the ticket counter.”

The Lauritzen Outpatient Center is named for the family of Bruce Lauritzen, chairman of First National of Nebraska and the lead financial donor for the project. The surgery center’s name acknowledges a capital gift from Dr. Charles Fritch and his wife, Judy.

HOK is a global design, architecture, engineering and planning firm.

University of Missouri-St. Louis Opens HOK-Designed Patient Care Center for College of Optometry

in Companies/News

$17 million project reshapes UMSL’s south campus

The University of Missouri¬-St. Louis has unveiled its College of Optometry’s new $17 million Patient Care Center on the South Campus. Designed by HOK, the two-story, 48,000-sq.-ft. building provides a space for clinical education and research for the college as well as comprehensive eye and vision care for the community.

“It’s so good to see this longtime dream of the College of Optometry’s finally complete,” said Larry Davis, dean of the college.

The Patient Care Center replaces the University Eye Center located in UMSL’s Marillac Hall, a building originally designed as a residence hall for nuns. The new facility is located along Natural Bridge Road, adjacent to the UMSL South MetroLink station. It has four service areas for adult eye care, pediatric eye care, contact lens eye care and primary healthcare. The two-story atrium with a signature “eye” window acts as a focal point of the building.

“Beyond its striking architecture and beauty, the Patient Care Center has greatly improved the operations of the eye care center,” said Davis. “In the short time we’ve occupied the building, we’ve recognized how the floor plan encourages collaboration among faculty across a variety of specialty areas. Patients will appreciate the logical, efficient flow as they move throughout the facility.”

“To accommodate UMSL’s patient care, educational and outreach needs, we designed the building to be highly flexible,” said Paul Whitson, AIA, senior vice president and regional leader of Healthcare at HOK in St. Louis. “Same-handed and equally sized treatment rooms will enable it to adapt to future changes within the healthcare industry.”

Approximately 13,000-square feet of space in the Patient Care Center is programmed for future community partnership opportunities, which might include an urgent care or dental clinic.

Funding for the center came partially from a supplemental fee assessed to optometry students. Additional funds came from internal reallocations within the college and campus reserves.

The improvements to the College of Optometry are the first phase of planned capital improvements on UMSL’s campus. Future construction phases could include the addition of a 200,000-sq.-ft. facility to co-locate all teaching, research and administrative functions for the College of Optometry.

The grand opening for the building will take place Nov. 4 from 3 to 5 p.m. The ceremony will include a ribbon cutting and short program.

HOK is a global design, architecture, engineering and planning firm. Through a network of 23 offices worldwide, HOK provides design excellence and innovation to create places that enrich people’s lives and help clients succeed. DesignIntelligence consistently ranks HOK as a leader in sustainable, high-performance design and technology innovation.

New HOK/CoreNet Global Report Explores Impact of Coworking on Corporate Real Estate

in Companies/News

HOK’s WorkPlace practice, in partnership with the UK Chapter of CoreNet Global, has released a new report that studies the impact of coworking from a corporate real estate (CRE) perspective.

Coworking is one of the fastest-growing sectors of the commercial real estate market. The new report, Coworking: A Corporate Real Estate Perspective, examines the drivers of coworking from the demand and supply sides, the industry risks and implications for corporate real estate, as well as information about the owners, coworkers and centers.

The HOK/CoreNet Global Coworking report highlights the ideas that changing business priorities and the need to attract talented people, reduce real estate costs, improve speed to innovation and increase productivity are driving corporations to consider different workplace models, including on- and off-site coworking.

“Although coworking space makes up less than one percent of the world’s office space, it represents an important workforce trend and highlights the strong desire of today’s employees to have workplace choices, community and flexibility,” said Kay Sargent, director of WorkPlace at HOK. “Driven by demand factors, including next-generation work styles and the desire for real estate portfolio agility, C-suite executives from human resources, operations, real estate and finance are increasingly interested in how coworking affects their work practices and policies—and how they need to design, manage and operate their workplaces.”

Key findings from the Coworking report also include:

The coworking concept is evolving to comprise accelerators, incubators and maker spaces. It reaches beyond office settings to include college campuses, retail locations, hotels and libraries.

The impact of coworking spaces on CRE includes providing new uses for older properties and for underutilized spaces in existing facilities.

The lowest engagement levels are found in employees who never work remotely. The highest employee engagement levels occur among those who work remotely less than 20% of the time.

Many coworking centers emerged in a time of high unemployment and low rents. But 54% of the coworkers will leave a specific location in less than a year. The high turnover and tenant instability challenge coworking centers to maintain profitability. They are vulnerable to market conditions and new competitors.

“For corporate occupiers and other real estate professionals, the coworking trend is worth watching, exploring and testing,” said Curtis Knapp, director of consulting for HOK. “It is a way to add flexibility to the portfolio and help match the ebb and flow of supply and demand. It can be one solution to the many challenges posed by the changing nature of both work and worker.”

HOK Coworking Report

HOK’s Pedal the Cause Cycling Team Raises More Than $4,000 for Cancer Research

in Companies/News

HOK’s annual Pedal for the Cause cycling team raised more than $4,000 for cancer awareness and research at Siteman Cancer Center and St. Louis Children’s Hospital.  The Sept. 24-25, 2016 ride was led by Tom Bahr, an avid cyclist and an architect on HOK’s design team for the Campus Renewal Project for BJC Barnes-Jewish Hospital, BJC St. Louis Children’s Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine.   HOK’s eight-person team cycled more than 140 combined miles.  Bahr was joined on the team by the three managing principals of HOK’s St. Louis office—Lance Cage, Eli Hoisington and Angelo Arzano—as well as Alyse Garbisch, Gabe Garrett, Tim Gaidis and Bob Schwartz.

“This ride gave us an opportunity to raise money for St. Louis-based funding for cancer research, discovery grants and clinical care,” said Arzano. “And we enjoyed seeing each other outside of the office to participate in a fun, healthy activity. It was a win-win for all of us.”

HOK is a global design, architecture, engineering and planning firm.

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