Missouri American’s New Clear Well Put into Service

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Missouri American Water has completed construction on a new $11 million clear well that can hold up to 1 million gallons of drinking water for Jefferson City customers.

Missouri American Water has completed construction on a new $11 million clear well that can hold up to 1 million gallons of drinking water for Jefferson City customers.

In addition, a new high-service pump station was built alongside the storage tank located on company property between High and Main streets in Jefferson City, according to a company news release. The new high-service pumps, which pump water to the distribution system piping and storage tanks, were installed to improve the efficiency of water delivery.

“The clear well, which serves as a storage tank for our treated drinking water, dated back to 1888 and was well past its expected life,” said Brent Haas, manager of Jefferson City operations for Missouri American Water.

The well was upgraded in 1927, but it had water leaks for many years due to underground cracks, Haas noted.

“The clear well supports our ability to maintain system pressure and meet customer water needs, especially in the summer when usage is higher due to watering lawns and other outdoor use,” said Renee Lawrence, senior project engineer for Missouri American Water.

Missouri American Water partnered with Goodwin Brothers Construction Co., the general contracting company, and several local companies such as Stokes Electric, Harold E. Butzer — Mechanical and Central Missouri Professional Services Inc. to design and build the new clear well during the 15-month construction project.

“Replacing aging water infrastructure like the clear well helps local fire departments’ emergency response efforts by maintaining pressure and improving system reliability,” Haas said.

The Missouri Public Service Commission is considering a rate increase request from Missouri American Water.

The company has asked to increase annual water and sewer revenues by approximately $73.5 million (21.1 percent), noting it plans to spend $950 million in water and sewer systems improvements across the state from 2018 through mid-2022. A decision from the PSC on the rate increase request is expected later this year.

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