Missouri’s Prevailing Wage Debate and Its Impact on Businesses and Workers Clarified

In the wake of the recent enactment of right to work legislation, Missouri lawmakers are proposing additional changes to the state’s business environment. Of note, a bill which would eliminate Missouri’s prevailing wage law, HB 104. Currently being revised by the Missouri House, if passed, the bill’s proposed effective date is August 28. 2017.

Shareholder Brad Kafka is vice chair of Polsinelli’s national Labor and Employment practice group and leads the firm’s St. Louis Labor and Employment practice group. Kafka is experienced in all aspects of labor and employment law including: federal and state court litigation, collective bargaining negotiations, defense of union organizing campaigns, and other areas. He is a frequent lecturer on labor, employment and ERISA topics before business groups and trade associations.

The prevailing wage issue can be confusing for employers, workers and business owners. Kafka can clarify the issue by explaining its significance in plain language and demystifying both sides of the issue. Kafka is an excellent source to answer complicated questions such as:

  • What is prevailing wage? How is it calculated?
  • Does it differ from county to county?
  • What industries would be affected by this change?
  • How could union trades be impacted by a change to prevailing wage?
  • How will businesses be impacted?
  • How will employees be impacted?
  • What has been the result in states that have eliminated prevailing wage?
  • How can businesses and employers prepare for this potential change?

Kafka is available for interviews in person, in studio, by phone and by email. He is also available for panel discussions on the topic.

Polsinelli is an Am Law 100 firm with approximately 800 attorneys in 20 offices, serving corporations, institutions, and entrepreneurs nationally.

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