My, How Time Flies: Windows 7 Will Be Gone in a Flash

in Technology
Joe Balsarotti

By JOE BALSAROTTI

It seems that the upcoming discontinuation of Windows 7, Microsoft Server 2008 and Adobe’s Flash were somehow a surprise to a number of businesses. Microsoft drops its monthly security updates and patches as of January 2020, as in the beginning of next year. We’ve consulted with our clients for a while to develop budgets and replacement plans for their networks, but far too many IT firms don’t like to give “bad news” – and as such, they leave such discussions until the last minute.

If your business is all Windows 10 or Server 2016, congratulations. Pat yourself on the back; you’re more prepared than most, it seems. If all this is all news to you, you need to get ready quick. The computer industry has been plagued with shortages of Intel processors for months now and there is no relief in sight. That means multiple months-long wait times for server and higher-end PC orders. Also, there are a number of application programs that need to be upgraded to run under Windows 10, so this tech refresh will probably take longer, from a calendar perspective, than previous ones. Networks with older NAS (network attached storage) units and old servers have problems connecting to new Windows 10 equipment, as W10 slammed the door on many of the security holes that the operating systems of these devices have.

Microsoft did its biggest push ever to position Windows 10 as its premier operating system. For more than a year, Microsoft gave free updates for users of both Windows 7 and Windows 8. Personally, I suspect sweeping the anything-but-popular Windows 8 under the rug was a large part of the strategy. However, narrowing the development focus to just one version certainly can’t hurt Microsoft, who has had its hands full trying to patch and secure multiple operating systems at the same time.

In January 2020, when Microsoft stops updating Windows 7, all those old machines become a security risk for your business and the data of both your company and its customers. As we’ve discussed before, running a business with known flaws in its PCs and networks opens it up for liability and loss of customers. Assuming one wants to stay in business, updating older technology is a business imperative in today’s environment. A new wrinkle is that Microsoft has said that updates will be available for those Windows 7 and Server 2008 customers who sign support contracts, but pricing will be such that updating the machines will be a far, far less expensive strategy.

Microsoft’s position is that Windows 10 is the “last version of Windows” and will morph over the years and undergo substantial updates on the fly, adopting the philosophy of Apple with its operating systems. Whether that idea will survive amidst changes in technology and widely varying needs of users is a gigantic question. Just ask the Apple owners who wake up to notice things that used to work no longer do because their systems can’t handle the new updates. Also, look forward to “as a service” offerings from Microsoft where monthly or annual payments will replace Windows bundled with systems. Microsoft has already been successful transitioning millions of Microsoft Office buyers onto monthly or annual payments for Office 365.

On top of these Microsoft changes, Flash – the language that powered websites for two decades – is finally going away. Flash, which was developed by Macromedia (and acquired by Adobe in 2005), brought easy animation to the web. However, Flash has been plagued with bugs and security flaws. Apple dropped support in its browsers and Apple co-founder Steve Jobs publicly skewered the software in an open letter back in 2010. Those using Firefox for browsing saw Flash support end, and Microsoft is dropping it from IE and Edge as well. At one point, more than 80 percent of users accessed some Flash-enabled website each and every day, but at last count that had dropped into the teens as HTML5 became the web language of choice. As with the Windows 7 transition, look for disruptions as old websites and applications that have not been rewritten become inaccessible.

Be sure to not only plan for the physical replacement of machines, servers and upgraded software, but also for training as Windows 10 and Windows servers have some substantial differences from their predecessors – and rewritten websites might have different functionality from their Flash version days.

Hopefully this isn’t new news. Hopefully your company and its tech staff (or outside provider) are already discussing this on an ongoing basis. However, if your current IT provider isn’t consulting with you at least annually to talk through refreshes to your technology, you may want to get serious about upgrading soon.

Technology is always in motion. To ignore it is to put your company at a disadvantage.

Joe Balsarotti is President of Software To Go and is a 40-year veteran of the computer industry, reaching back to the days of the Apple II. Keep up with tech by following him at Facebook.com/SoftwareToGo or on Twitter @softtogo.                             

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