National Institute of Building Sciences Launches Infrastructure 2022 Series

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By KERRY SMITH, EDITOR, ST. LOUIS CONSTRUCTION NEWS AND REVIEW MAGAZINE

The National Institute of Building Sciences invites all St. Louis-area contractors, engineers and architects to participate in its Infrastructure 2022 Series.

The quarterly webinar series, sponsored by the Consultative Council, will focus on key infrastructure-specific topics, according to Stephen Ayers, interim CEO of NIBS.

“Our government is placing much-needed funds to maintain, upgrade and solidify our nation’s foundation,” said Ayers. “This series comes at a critical time for our communities.”

Webinar sessions will cover transportation infrastructure and how it affects daily commutes, goods and supply chain challenges, lifelines and access to high-speed networks, and preparedness and mitigating the climate crisis.

The first session, “Your Daily Commute,” take place from 12 noon to 1:15pm Central Standard Time on February 16. The session covers the passage of H.R. 3684, the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, which ensures that daily commutes across metropolitan cities and small towns will be improved. H.R. 3684 reauthorizes surface transportation programs for five years and invests $110 billion in additional funding.

To learn more or register for Infrastructure 2022, go to https://www.nibs.org/infrastructure-2022-webinar-series. There is no cost to register.

“Infrastructure is the thread that holds together the built environment,” Ayers said. “The NIBS Consultative Council assembles high-level building community representatives to make recommendations directly to the executive and legislative branches of government to improve the nation’s buildings and infrastructure.”

Each year, the council publishes the Moving Forward Report to investigate key issues, offering solutions to overcoming the challenges these issues present, according to Ayers. “The 2020 Moving Forward Report examines the critical area of ‘Ensuring Healthy Buildings: How Buildings Can Protect and Promote Public Health,’” he said.

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