EPA

EPA Recognizes Liberty, Missouri Design-Build Wastewater Treatment Facility for Excellence and Innovation in Clean Water Infrastructure

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On November 8, 2018, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recognized 30 clean water infrastructure projects for excellence and innovation within the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) program. Honored projects include large wastewater infrastructure projects to small decentralized and agriculture projects.

The City of Liberty previously sent their wastewater to Kansas City to get treatment from another plant. However, when this facility had to respond to a consent decree to reduce CSOs, an increase in rates for Liberty would have been a result. Liberty decided to forgo transferring their wastewater and instead took out a $79 million CWSRF loan to build a new state of the art wastewater treatment facility of their own and perform conveyance system improvements. The new facility was the first Missouri CWSRF project to use a design-build approach. Under a design-build contract, the owner contracted with a single design and construction team led by Goodwin Brothers Construction. In a traditional design-bid-build project, the owner manages separate contracts for design and construction. Some of the potential advantages of design-build include quicker project delivery; fewer changes, claims, and litigation; enhanced project coordination; and firm costs. The new facility built using this design-build approach has a 5 MGD capacity and includes treatment processes for activated sludge, bio-phosphorus, and nitrogen reduction. This facility has received a Design-Build Institute of America 2017 National Award for Merit in water/wastewater and was named Project of the Year for 2017 by the Design-Build Institute of America-Mid-America Region.

Goodwin Brothers Construction is a 3rdgeneration General Contractor providing Design Build and Design Bid Build delivery projects in the water and wastewater sectors.  For more information on this project please visit Spotlight

EPA, Four States Host Radon Stakeholders’ Meeting March 7 in Manhattan, KS

EPA Region 7 and its state partners will host the 11th Annual Region 7 EPA/State Radon Stakeholders’ Meeting from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on March 7, 2017, at the Hilton Garden Inn and Conference Center, 410 South 3rd St., Manhattan, Kan. This meeting is being held at no cost for those who have a stake in protecting the public from unnecessary exposure to radon in homes, schools and businesses.

EPA Region 7 and its partners, Iowa Department of Public Health, Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, and American Association of Radon Scientists & Technologists (AARST) want to bring interested stakeholders together to discuss common issues associated with radon awareness and mitigation to better understand problems and solutions from different perspectives.

Agenda items include “Surviving Lung Cancer,” “Hope for Lung Cancer Patients – Progress in Treatment,” state and tribal breakout sessions; updates from state agencies, AARST and EPA; specific discussions about difficult house remediation situations, and marketing tips/strategies.

These meetings are specifically designed to provide better ways to assist the public and reduce radon exposure. Participants can register online at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/2017R7RadonMeeting. (No cost for registration, but participants should register by Feb. 21, 2017.) Dress is casual.

The meeting has been approved for continuing education credits by Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, the National Radon Proficiency Program (NRPP), and the National Radon Safety Board (NRSB).

For questions, contact Bruce Snead at 785-532-4992 or bsnead@ksu.edu.

EPA to Put in Place Process to Evaluate Chemicals That May Pose Risk; First Time in 40 Years

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The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is moving swiftly to propose how it will prioritize and evaluate chemicals, given that the final processes must be in place within the first year of the new law’s enactment, or before June 22, 2017.

“After 40 years, we can finally address chemicals currently in the marketplace,” said Jim Jones, assistant administrator for EPA’s Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention. “Today’s action will set into motion a process to quickly evaluate chemicals and meet deadlines required under, and essential to, implementing the new law.”

When the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) was enacted in 1976, it grandfathered in thousands of unevaluated chemicals that were in commerce at the time. The old law failed to provide EPA with the tools to evaluate chemicals and to require companies to generate and provide data on chemicals they produced.

EPA is proposing three rules to help administer the new process. They are:

Inventory Rule. There are currently over 85,000 chemicals on EPA’s Inventory, and many of these are no longer actively produced. The rule will require manufacturers, including importers, to notify EPA and the public on the number of chemicals still being produced.

Prioritization Rule. This will establish how EPA will prioritize chemicals for evaluation. EPA will use a risk-based screening process and criteria to identify whether a particular chemical is either high or low priority. A chemical designated as high priority must undergo evaluation. Chemicals designated as low priority are not required to undergo evaluation.

Risk Evaluation Rule. This will establish how EPA will evaluate the risk of existing chemicals. The agency will identify steps for the risk evaluation process, including publishing the scope of the assessment. Chemical hazards and exposures will be assessed, along with characterizing and determining risks. This rule also outlines how the agency intends to seek public comment on chemical evaluations.

These three rules incorporate comments received from a series of public meetings held in August 2016.

If EPA identifies unreasonable risk in the evaluation, it is required to eliminate that risk through regulations. Under TSCA, the agency must have at least 20 ongoing risk evaluations by the end of 2019.

Comments on the proposed rules must be received 60 days after date of publication in the Federal Register. At that time, go to the dockets at https://www.regulations.gov/ and search for: HQ-OPPT-2016-0426 for the Inventory Rule; HQ-OPPT-2016-0636 for the Prioritization Rule; and HQ-OPPT-2016-0654 for the Risk Evaluation Rule.

Learn more about today’s proposals: https://www.epa.gov/assessing-and-managing-chemicals-under-tsca/frank-r-lautenberg-chemical-safety-21st-century-act-5