Seal the deal

Five Must-Haves to Make Your Good Website into a Great Website

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Stephanie Woodcock

By STEPHANIE WOODCOCK

Before we start with the list of must-haves for a good website, let me preface that first and foremost a website should be responsive and mobile friendly. Studies show that more than 50 percent of all websites and emails are opened on mobile devices; if your website is not responsive and mobile-friendly, stop reading now and find a web designer.

The next five points do not matter until you have a responsive site that people can read on their mobile devices. Take a look at your website using your smartphone. If the street address or services or pictures are illegible or too small, chances are it’s not mobile-friendly. You should not have to place your forefinger and thumb on the screen to enlarge the street address. A responsive site organizes the information on your website to best fit whatever screen on which it is displaying – desktop, smartphone or iPad.

Now we can begin. Here are five must-haves for a good, if not great, website:

1 – Multiple methods of contact easily visible and located in the expected places.

Potential customers are on your website – hooray – and obviously the next step is that you’d like to connect with them. Make this as simple for them as possible by making your phone number, address (linked and coded to map/directions) and email address easy to find. These items are standard in the footer and/or headers of a website, and this is where people will look for them, in addition to the “contact us” page of your website.

2 – Clear, concise content.

No one knows your industry like you. Now that I’ve landed on your website, please don’t bury me in industry jargon and terminology that I don’t understand. Your home page should be informative, concise and user-friendly. It should not be like reading IKEA directions (sorry, IKEA). You should be using layman terms to simply describe your product and services so that people feel like they can call you and have a conversation with you on their terms. Customers are not impressed by your wealth of knowledge and expertise in the field. They just want you to back up your work. They want to understand the gist of how you can help them and make their lives easier. Don’t be the hero in the story of what you do. Let your customers be the hero and you the guide.

3 – Unique, fresh content.

This is for all you Google-happy folks out there. Google crawls your page when new content is uploaded, hence the popularity of blogs on business websites. And Google is grading your content. Pencils down: Do your meta tags and keywords match your content? Is your content borrowed from another similar website? (That’s a big no-no.) Has your content been updated within the past 90 days? These three things heavily affect your search rankings. While many B2B companies in the construction industry don’t necessarily get their customers from Google searches, it is still important to remember and consider. Google is a giant with which to be reckoned. In order to play nice with Google, you need to have fresh, relevant content for your industry. A post once a month related to your services is a great place to start; this can easily be uploaded by office staff on the back end of a website built on a CMS (content management system) platform.

4 – Appropriate use of color and images.

I have seen many websites that look like a cookie cutter website with a logo attached. This is not a brand. This is a sad excuse for a website. Where is your identity? For what does your company stand? A branded website with strong sense of style, imagery and color helps set you apart from the competition and supports your sales effort by evoking a professional, signature brand. You don’t want to be known as the generic company that’s been around for a long time with that great salesperson. You want to be known for your brand. A brand can do a lot of things. It can make you look bigger than what you are. It can attract the right kind of customers. It can support a sales push. It can enhance work ethic of your company’s culture. A brand is so much more than looks, and it starts with your website. More so today than ever, a digital identity is crucial for brand success.

Lastly, and most importantly:

5 – A call to action.

You have a potential customer on your website! Now what? What do you want him or her to do next? Customers do not take action until they are challenged to take action. Unless we are bold in our calls to action, we will be ignored. We assume that we want them to buy from us, but that’s not correct. Customers have to be pushed into action. There is power in clarity. Make sure your site flows in a way that leads them to the action you want them to take, whether that is simply to learn more about your business or to pick up the phone and call you. Do you believe in your product? Customers aren’t looking for brands that are filled with doubt. They are looking for brands that have solutions to their problems. There are two kinds of calls to action: a direct call to action and a transitional call to action. For a good example of a direct call to action, go to the website of your favorite pizza chain. On the front page there is a call to action to get you to place an order such as pictures of delicious (albeit greasy) pizza. You’ll likely also find easy-to-click “order now” buttons. It will push you through the order, guide you step by step and try to upsell you soda and garlic bread.

As a brand, it’s our job to pursue our customers in a very similar fashion. We are the ones who need to take the initiative. Be bold and be direct when it comes to your website. State your purpose, have direction, include plenty of call to action buttons and methods to reach you, and support this clear messaging with a strong brand, logo, colors, imagery and easy navigation.

A good website can make or break a company. Let’s make yours.

Stephanie Woodcock is president of Seal the Deal Too, a St. Louis-based marketing, creative & communications firm. She can be reached at stephanie@sealthedealtoo.com.

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The Epic Fails of Sales: Eat Your Sales Strategy Veggies or No Dessert for You

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Tom Woodcock

By Tom WOODCOCK

After 30 years of selling, managing sales efforts, creating sales strategies and working in sales consulting, I may have a couple things narrowed down. People love to corner me and ask me their biggest sales question, waiting for a pearl of wisdom.

The one thing about pearls is that they take a long time to form. I’ve witnessed virtually every sales technique and gimmick known to man. I often chuckle when a young, newly college-educated star gives me the inside scoop on how sales works in this day and age. I love their zeal, but I saw that back in 1982, my friend.

Everyone is looking for a new angle to avoid doing the tough stuff, trying to reduce personal contact and get greater results. Kind of sounds like an oxymoron (or just moronic). Apps, social media and website innovation can all replace genuine sales work, I’m told. Technology makes it so easy for the customer to do business with you. Well then, they just have to, right?

Not so fast, Padawan! We are still human, the last time I checked. We are communicators by nature. We still like to talk to people we like…some more than others, but we all do. Companies spend gobs of money on methods they are sure will work, or are told will work, only to remain exactly where they are with regard to revenue and profitability. Why is that? My Facebook page is killer and I have a gazillion likes! I’m number two on Google under my trade! I even Instagram all my projects! Plus, you should see my website. Then thud. Same old, same old. Here are the most common errors I see:

  • Saying, Not Doing – Yeah, this is number one. Many people talk a good game but few enact the techniques necessary that develop into action. They don’t see people, make the phone calls, follow up, join associations, create a sales strategy or properly negotiate. They usually revert to selling by price. They’ll often talk a good game but they have no game. Sad but true. The easiest step of doing what you know to do is skipped.
  • No Plan – Could you imagine building a facility without a plan? Well, how can you build an effective sales effort without one? I mean, where are you going to go? Who are you going to talk to? What are your goals? How will you attain them? Where do you need to improve? These are not easy questions for many to answer. Many owners and reps I meet with have an epiphany when I discuss developing a sales plan. I feel like a genius, when in reality this is 101 to an effective sales effort. So if steps one and two are missed, good luck! Throw that dart into the ocean and hope you hit a fish. Better yet, bid until your little estimator brain falls out on the floor and dies a slow death. Estimating is not sales. Discounting is not selling. Giving away the house is not business development. Having a sales plan can eliminate the pricing game.
  • No Competitive Difference – If you’ve ever been to one of my seminars, which I’m sure you have (wink wink), you know this is foundational to everything I teach. If I’ve trained you one on one, you’ve seen me with a blue face because I’ve told you this until that occurs. If you do not give me, the prospect, a reason to choose you over a competitor, why would I spend more to choose you? Even if you were the same price, why choose you? Why would I change from my current supplier I trust and choose you? This is the baseline, folks. You first must know what makes you the better choice, and then know how to communicate that effectively. Low price is not a competitive difference; it’s simply math. Any caveman or cavewoman can lower their price. My five-year-old is at this stage in his mathematical skills. “If I charge $3 but the other guy is charging $2, if I go to $1.50, can I have the job?” Find out what makes you different from the competitor and sell it.

Those are only three of the common errors, but they definitely occur the most often. Lord knows, I try to convince thousands of construction industry professionals of these truths. Some have heard it over and over again, but to no avail. I regularly get asked to speak on sales at events and privately to companies. They’ll bring me back multiple times over the years and ask if I have something new. In actuality, they need to hear this stuff again…and again…and again. I still see these same mistakes made everyday, but now with new techniques. Facebook pages that say the same things as their competitor’s page. Social media posts saying exactly the same things. Websites that are merely plug and play templates because the businesses are plug and play. Yikes. New formats, but the same gruel served up only microwaved.

As companies come into the new construction season, they’ll scramble to spend marketing dollars to get attention. Not that they shouldn’t, but to what sales effort are these efforts attached? What’s the plan to capitalize on the interest created? Is there a clear separation defined? Will the sales effort and follow up be done or merely talked about?

It’s tough to be the person who has to tell a company that just dropped $20k on a website that it’s meaningless if they don’t have a detailed sales strategy. It doesn’t always get me an invite to the company BBQ.

There is no denying that if you eat your sales vegetables, dessert will soon follow. Companies love when revenues and profits increase but struggle to format a way to achieve that end. Regardless of the fact, it’s there for the taking. If you sell properly, it’s all low-hanging fruit!

Tom Woodcock, president, seal the deal, is a speaker and trainer for the construction industry nationwide. He can be reached at 314-775-9217 or admin@tomwoodcocksealthedeal.com.

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